The Spiritual Case for Biden

  1. Working to Undermine the Democratic Election Process

Refusing to agree to conceding a lost election and attempting to undermine the election results by claiming — without any evidence — that mail-in ballots are a “big scam”. 

Openly stating that they need to keep too many people from voting so that Republicans can keep power.
The below quote is in reference to Democratic proposals to provide substantially more funding for absentee and mail-in voting:
[“The things they had in there were crazy,” Trump said. “They had things — levels of voting that, if you ever agreed to it, you’d never have a Republican elected in this country again.”]
While refusing funds for mail-in voting.
[“They need that money in order to have the post office work so it can take all of these millions and millions of ballots,” Trump said in an interview with Fox Business’s Maria Bartiromo. “If they don’t get those two items, that means you can’t have universal mail-in voting because they’re not equipped to have it.”]

Demanding — with neither evidence nor coherency — that political opponents — Obama, Biden, Hillary Clinton, and others — be jailed.
[“Unless Bill Barr indicts these people for crimes,” declared the president, “the greatest political crime in the history of our country, then we’re gonna get little satisfaction unless I win. Because I won’t forget it. But these pWeople should be indicted, this was the greatest political crime in the history of our country. And that includes Obama, and that includes Biden; these are people that spied on my campaign, and we have everything.”]

Encouraging his supporters to come out and “watch” the polling place.
What is this but a not-so-subtle call for voter intimidation? 
What are they going to “see”? except people lined up, trying to vote without having a partisan mob marching around them?
[CNN 10/1/2020: “State officials brace for conflict after Trump tells supporters to ‘go into the polls and watch’”.]

2. Stoking rather than refusing to condemn racism and white nationalism.

[Washington Post 7/4/2020: “Trump’s push to amplify racism unnerves Republicans who have long enabled him.”
The Guardian 9/30/2020: “Trump’s refusal to condemn white supremacy fits pattern of extremist rhetoric”.
Southern Poverty Law Center 8/23/2020: “President Trump is stoking white nationalism, exploiting racist fear.”

Trump’s “Stand back, and stand by” is classic example of race baiting. 
In the presidential debate, he is asked by the moderator if he would condemn white supremists and ask them to “stand down” during protests about police targeting minorities. 

Trump replies: “Sure, I’m willing to… but I would say almost everything I see is from the left wing, not from the right wing,”

He asks who he’s supposed to condemn. 
Biden says “the Proud Boys”— twice. 

Trump replies “Proud Boys — stand back and stand by. But I’ll tell you what… Somebody’s got to do something about antifa and the left because this is not a right-wing problem.”

There is then of course in the next few days a lot of concern voiced about the ambiguous and actually rather encouraging “stand by”, while the Proud Boys leader writes that the “‘stand by’ remark was the president ‘basically said to go f**k them up. This makes me so happy.’” And they make “Standing By” T-Shirts. [9/30/2020 Newsweek article]

The next day reporters ask him to clarify his “stand by” comment, and he deflects with, “‘law and order to be a very important part of our campaign’ when asked whether he welcomed white supremacist support.”

Pressed further: “I’ve always denounced any form, any form of any of that.” Of what Trump? You’ve denounced any form of what? You can’t say it, can you? Why?

Then on Thursday on Fox News, in an interview with the Trump-friendly Sean Hannity, Trump says, “I’ve said it many times, but let me be clear again: I condemn the KKK. I condemn all white supremacists. I condemn the Proud Boys. “I don’t know much about the Proud Boys, almost nothing, but I condemn that,” he added.

If you are a member of the Proud Boys, what conclusions do you draw? You know that — as he’s not yet secured his dictatorship — he has to at some point say you are wrong and should not police protest rallies for racial justice. And so he does, after two days, and when now he’s clearly scripted and rehearsed what he’s supposed to say.

[From a 10/1/2020 Complex article about the Proud Boys:
“In theory, (group founder) McInnes touts an embrace of white pride by closing the borders, preventing dilution of white culture, and encouraging everyone to adopt Western, white, English-speaking habits and values. In practice, the Proud Boys are effectively a ragtag fight club who purposefully targets, triggers, and provokes anyone perceived to be in opposition to their values for an excuse to become violent. McInnes has often recommended violence as an effective solution to problems and has encouraged members to literally ‘fight for the cause.’”]

Related: The New Republic 8/12/2020: “Donald Trump’s Coded Message to White-Nationalist ‘Accelerationists’” 

3. A War on Truth and Accuracy.

An incomparably high number of untrue statements

A War on the Press
[Committee to Protect Journalist’s 8/16/2020 report:
The Trump Administration and the Media
From the Intro:
“The Trump administration has stepped up prosecutions of news sources, interfered in the business of media owners, harassed journalists crossing U.S. borders, and empowered foreign leaders to restrict their own media. But Trump’s most effective ploy has been to destroy the credibility of the press, dangerously undermining truth and consensus even as the COVID-19 pandemic threatens to kill tens of thousands of Americans. A special report of the Committee to Protect Journalists.”]

4. Undermining Checks & Consolidating Power

Undermining the independence of the civil service.

Undermining the independence of the judiciary with ????

Packing the courts with far-right justices (need comparison of how many and tactics).

5. Corruption

Refusing to acknowledge — let alone condemn — Russia’s concerted interference the 2016 election on his behalf.

Siding with Russian intelligence reports of US intelligence reports.

Withholding US aid to a foreign nation, while making it clear that the money was contingent upon that government digging up dirt on a political rival.

 Preferring the company of dictators to democratic leaders.

Trump Not Alone: GOP Enabling His Attacks on Democracy

Trump’s anti-democratic push dovetails nicely with voter disenfranchisement by the Republican party. Generally, the complicity of the Republican Senate (which represents approximately X% of Americans) has encouraged Trump’s dismantling of the checks and balances necessary for a democratic (as opposed to an autocratic) division of power.

You can read and read and read until you’re blue in the heart.

1.
Donald Trump has undermined our shared representative democracy in fundamental ways and appears to be actively pursuing an autocracy.

There is ample reading on this subject. 

Article after article, reason after reason:

Refusing to agree to conceding a lost election and attempting to undermine the election results by claiming — without any evidence — that mail-in ballots are a “big scam”. 

Openly stating that they need to keep too many people from voting so that Republicans can keep power.
The below quote is in reference to Democratic proposals to provide substantially more funding for absentee and mail-in voting:
[“The things they had in there were crazy,” Trump said. “They had things — levels of voting that, if you ever agreed to it, you’d never have a Republican elected in this country again.”]
While refusing funds for mail-in voting.
[“They need that money in order to have the post office work so it can take all of these millions and millions of ballots,” Trump said in an interview with Fox Business’s Maria Bartiromo. “If they don’t get those two items, that means you can’t have universal mail-in voting because they’re not equipped to have it.”]

Demanding — with neither evidence nor coherency — that political opponents — Obama, Biden, Hillary Clinton, and others — be jailed.
[“Unless Bill Barr indicts these people for crimes,” declared the president, “the greatest political crime in the history of our country, then we’re gonna get little satisfaction unless I win. Because I won’t forget it. But these pWeople should be indicted, this was the greatest political crime in the history of our country. And that includes Obama, and that includes Biden; these are people that spied on my campaign, and we have everything.”]

Stoking rather than refusing to condemn racism and white nationalism.
[Washington Post 7/4/2020: “Trump’s push to amplify racism unnerves Republicans who have long enabled him.”
The Guardian 9/30/2020: “Trump’s refusal to condemn white supremacy fits pattern of extremist rhetoric”.
Southern Poverty Law Center 8/23/2020: “President Trump is stoking white nationalism, exploiting racist fear.”

Encouraging his supporters to come out and “defend” the election; ie: Encouraging voter intimidation at the polls.
[CNN 10/1/2020: “State officials brace for conflict after Trump tells supporters to ‘go into the polls and watch’”

(Defend the election against what? 
Repeated Republican claims have voter fraud have been disproven time and time again. 

But we know what the election needs to be defended against: non-whites.

Intimidating journalists and discouraging independent reporting.

Undermining the independence of the civil service.

Undermining the independence of the judiciary with ????

Packing the courts with far-right justices (need comparison of how many and tactics).

Refusing to acknowledge — let alone condemn — Russia’s concerted interference the 2016 election on his behalf.

Siding with Russian intelligence reports of US intelligence reports.

Withholding US aid to a foreign nation, while making it clear that the money was contingent upon that government digging up dirt on a political rival.

 Preferring the company of dictators to democratic leaders.

Amassing an astronomical number of untruths, and generally showing contempt for facts.

Trump’s anti-democratic push dovetails nicely with voter disenfranchisement by the Republican party. Generally, the complicity of the Republican Senate (which represents approximately X% of Americans) has encouraged Trump’s dismantling of the checks and balances necessary for a democratic (as opposed to an autocratic) division of power.

You can read and read and read until you’re blue in the heart.

Here are a couple quotes to illustrate how Trump is not kidding, how this is not a joke:

“He’s now president for life. President for life,” Trump said of Xi [after China removed the two-term limit on their state-chosen presidents]. “No, he’s great. And look, he was able to do that. I think it’s great. Maybe we’ll have to give that a shot someday.”

“We’ve cut more regulations in a year and a quarter than any administration, whether it’s four years, eight years or, in one case, 16 years,” he said. “Should we go back to 16 years? Congressman, can we have that extended? The last time I jokingly said that, the papers started saying ‘he’s got despotic tendencies!’ No, I’m not looking to do it, unless you want to do it.”

“Get rid of the ballots [apparently in reference to mail-in ballots] and you’ll have a very peaceful — there won’t be a transfer, frankly. There will be a continuation.” [This exchange happened while a reporter was trying to get Trump to agree to a peaceful transfer of power if he lost the election. Trump would not agree to that.]

A “continuation”. 
Like in Russia.
Or China.
One heroic party ruling forever in eternal glory: 
Please agree! Or risk wealth, prestige, safety, family, life. The choice is yours. See, we have choices here too! What do you need democracy for?

It is happening. Trump is prepping, is grooming us for an autocratic takeover, while simultaneously taking the practical steps necessary to realize this coup of our shared democracy.

2.
We must prefer the preservation of our representative democracy over specific political victories. Because to the degree we lose representative democracy, we lose the ability to influence our shared democracy, and there is no longer an effective check on madness, corruption, and tyranny.

That is to say: Representative democracy is a fundamental good, and destroying it in the name of any particular “good” is akin to destroying an individual’s ability to make coherent and meaningful decisions in the name of some particular “good”. It is self-defeating. 

Accordingly, we citizens of the United States of America should do everything in our power to inform our fellow citizens that Donald Trump presents an immediate, acute threat to our shared representative democracy. We should work to elect Joseph Biden, who is willing and able to help us begin the process of restoring and reinvigorating democracy in our country. And we should work to make sure this election is fair.

We’ve written many essays about how Representative Democracy is a Spiritual Good. But the basic argument is pretty self-explanatory: 

The more corrupt and/or cut-throat the political/economic/societal climate, the harder it is to be both happy and decent. 

We make our fundamental civic duty of serving as a final check on madness and corruption in government much easier to the degree that we maintain our government’s transparency, openness, honesty, clarity, accuracy, competency, civility, good-faith, and the rules and norms that preserve the balance of power and keep any individual or group from amassing too much power.

To the degree we lose shared control over our government, all our political opinions become moot as the juggernaut of corruption maintaining itself pursues a more and more desperate and desolate, scorched earth, my-ends-justify-any-means logic. And the more that becomes our background reality, the hardier it is to enjoy material wealth and basic goods like safety and decent food and clean water without becoming complicit in cheating, stealing, fraud, cruelty, and general injustice. The easier and more likely it becomes for us and our fellow citizens to sacrifice common decency, and so harm our souls even as we harm the world.

By preserving representative democracy, we make it easier for us and other people to be both happy and decent. And we make it easier for goodness to be effective: because in a healthy government, good, wholesome, helpful, win-win ideas, services, and organizations gain more power and prestige and thus have more ability to do good. Whereas the more corrupt a government, the easier it is for harmful, corrupt, unhealthy organizations to gain the upper hand and thus have more ability to do bad.

Some argue that, for example, abortion is so evil that one must vote Republican in order to fill the court with justices who will overturn Roe v. Wade. This argument assumes either that the Republican party will never gain so much power, corruption, and ill-will that it would accept the destruction of our democracy; or it assumes that abortion is so bad that ridding the land of it is worth accepting a despotic autocracy. As outlined above, the former assumption is clearly a very questionable and dangerous one. And as for the latter argument: Once you effectively destroy a democracy, you don’t know and cannot control how the autocratic power structures will evolve. Perhaps in a few years, the government will decide that any woman who already has a child will have to abort the second one. (Is a link needed to point out that such a move is not unprecedented in recent human history?)

But aren’t they all hopelessly corrupt? Can a vote for Biden really make a difference. We have tried above to point out the ways in which Trump has consistently sought to abandon the democratic game-plan for an autocratic. Below we list a few links from experts on the subject, who are sounding the alarm that Trump is not just a flawed human and a bad president, but a unique, acute, and imminent threat to our democracy:America’s Democratic Unraveling
Countries fail the same way businesses do, gradually and then suddenly.www.foreignaffairs.com

https://news.berkeley.edu/2020/09/30/american-democracy-needed-reforms/Is the U.S. a failed state in 2020? Experts’ answers range from “maybe” to “hell, yes”
If the United States isn’t a failed state in 2020, it is rapidly on its way toward becoming one. Economists, historians…www.salon.com
Donald Trump Is Attacking American Democracy at Its Core
One thing you cannot accuse Donald Trump of is trying to disguise his nefarious intentions. For months now, legal…www.newyorker.com

https://www.buzzfeednews.com/article/davidmack/foreign-election-observer-experts-fear-for-us-democracy

There are systemic flaws in the system which have allowed Trump to do the damage he’s already done to the process, culture, and institutions our representative democracy. If he goes unchecked, will allow him to do even greater damage in the coming years. Voting Trump and his Republican enablers out of office and protecting the integrity of this critical election as best we possibly can: this is step one to restoring a healthy representative democracy. But much more work will be required.

Need to outline steps of good government and how biden’s plan segues and where it can be improved. does trump say anything about good government on his site? probably not: probably empty talk about draining the very swamp he’s filling

1.
Donald Trump has undermined our shared representative democracy in fundamental ways and shows no signs of letting up on his push for an autocracy.

There is ample reading on this subject. 

Article after article, reason after reason. From refusing to agree to conceding a lost election, from openly stating that they need to keep too many people from voting so that Republicans can keep power, to attempting to subvert mail-in voting also out of fear (he said so himself) that too many people would vote, to undermining the independence of the civil service, to stoking rather than refusing to condemn white nationalism, to encouraging his supporters to come out and “defend” the election (against what? Repeated Republican claims have voter fraud have been disproven time and time again? but we know what the election needs to be defended against: a large turnout), from intimidating journalists and discouraging independent reporting, to undermining the independence of the judiciary, to siding with Russian intelligence reports of US intelligence reports, to withholding US aid to a foreign government in an attempt to coerce that government into digging up dirt on a political rival, to preferring the company of dictators to democratic leaders, to amassing an astronomical number of untruths.

You can read and read and read until you puke.

Maybe a couple quotes will help us understand that Trump is not kidding and this is not a joke:

“We’ve cut more regulations in a year and a quarter than any administration, whether it’s four years, eight years or, in one case, 16 years,” he said. “Should we go back to 16 years? Congressman, can we have that extended? The last time I jokingly said that, the papers started saying ‘he’s got despotic tendencies!’ No, I’m not looking to do it, unless you want to do it.”

“He’s now president for life. President for life,” Trump said of Xi [after China removed the two-term limit on their state-chosen presidents]. “No, he’s great. And look, he was able to do that. I think it’s great. Maybe we’ll have to give that a shot someday.”

Hello! It is happening. He’s grooming us for an autocratic takeover while simultaneously taking the necessary steps to force us to serve his sickly ego-driven needs.

2.
We must prefer representative democracy to other political victories, because to the degree we lose representative democracy, we lose the ability to influence our shared democracy.

That is to say: Representative democracy is a fundamental good, and destroying it in the name of any particular “good” is akin to destroying your ability to make coherent and meaningful decisions in the name of any particular “good”.

Accordingly, we citizens of the United States of America should do everything in our power to inform our fellow citizens that Donald Trump presents an immediate, acute threat to our shared representative democracy. We should work to elect Joseph Biden, who is willing and able to help us begin the process of restoring and reinvigorating democracy in our country. And we should work to make sure this election is fair.

We’ve written many essays about how Representative Democracy is a Spiritual Good. But the basic argument is pretty self-explanatory: 

The more corrupt and/or cut-throat the political/economic/societal climate, the harder it is to be both happy and decent. 

To the degree we can, transparency, openness, honesty, accuracy, competency, the rules and norms that preserve the balance of power and keep any individual or group from amassing too much power, civility, and good-faith in government; we make our fundamental civic duty of serving as a final check on madness and corruption in government much easier. 

To the degree we lose shared control over our government, all our political opinions become moot as the juggernaut of corrupt power maintaining itself pursues a more and more desperate and desolate, scorched earth, my-ends-justify-any-means logic. And the more that becomes our background reality, the hardier it is to enjoy material wealth and basic goods like safety and decent food and clean water without becoming complicit in cheating, stealing, fraud, cruelty, and general injustice. 

By preserving representative democracy, we make it easier for us and other people to be both happy and decent. And we make it easier for goodness to be effective: because in a healthy government, good, wholesome, helpful, win-win ideas, services, and organizations gain more power and prestige and thus have more ability to do good. Whereas the more corrupt a government, the easier it is for harmful, corrupt, unhealthy organizations to gain the upper hand and thus have more ability to do bad.

There’s one more section to go.

Editorial Team: B. Willard & A. Whistletown
Copyright: AM Watson

https://www.newsweek.com/trump-president-16-years-life-884073

https://www.bloombergquint.com/opinion/trump-s-election-threat-threatens-the-economy-too

https://www.cnn.com/2020/08/14/politics/trump-election-meddling-democracy-russia/index.html

https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2020/09/24/trump-is-worst-threat-our-democracy-since-1930s/

https://www.npr.org/2020/09/22/915843471/trump-expands-ban-on-racial-sensitivity-training-to-federal-contractors

https://orgs.law.harvard.edu/democrats/2019/12/10/trump-and-the-threat-to-democracy/

https://slate.com/news-and-politics/2020/07/democrats-fail-bill-barr-testimony.html

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2020/mar/30/trump-republican-party-voting-reform-coronavirus

https://www.cnn.com/2020/08/13/politics/trump-usps-funding-comments-2020-election/index.html

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2020/aug/06/republicans-florida-amendment-4-voting-rights

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2020/sep/09/us-election-trump-democracy-imperiled

1.
Donald Trump has undermined our shared representative democracy in fundamental ways and appears to be actively pursuing an autocracy.

There is ample reading on this subject. 

Article after article, reason after reason:

Refusing to agree to conceding a lost election

[President Trump declined for a second straight day to commit to a peaceful transfer of power if he lost the election, repeating baseless assertions that the voting would be a “big scam,” even as leading Republicans scrambled to assure the public that their party would respect the Constitution.

“We want to make sure that the election is honest, and I’m not sure that it can be,” Mr. Trump told reporters on Thursday before leaving the White House for North Carolina.]

Demanding political opponents be jailed.

[The president’s rambling and ill-tempered interview with Maria Bartiromo on Thursday saw him run through a long list of his usual grievances, but he was particularly rancorous on the subject of supposed Obama-era “crimes” against him for which he wants to see his predecessor indicted, along with Joe Biden, Hillary Clinton and many others.

“Unless Bill Barr indicts these people for crimes,” declared the president, “the greatest political crime in the history of our country, then we’re gonna get little satisfaction unless I win. Because I won’t forget it. But these people should be indicted, this was the greatest political crime in the history of our country. And that includes Obama, and that includes Biden; these are people that spied on my campaign, and we have everything.]

Openly stating that they need to keep too many people from voting so that Republicans can keep power.

[In an interview on “Fox & Friends,” Trump referenced proposals from Democrats in the coronavirus stimulus negotiations that would have vastly increased funding for absentee and vote-by-mail options. The final package included $400 million for the effort, which was far less than what Democrats had sought.

“The things they had in there were crazy,” Trump said. “They had things — levels of voting that, if you ever agreed to it, you’d never have a Republican elected in this country again.”]

Attempting to subvert mail-in voting out of fear (he said so himself) that too many people would vote.

Stoking rather than refusing to condemn white nationalism.

Encouraging his supporters to come out and “defend” the election.

(Defend the election against what? 
Repeated Republican claims have voter fraud have been disproven time and time again. 

But we know what the election needs to be defended against: non-whites.

Intimidating journalists and discouraging independent reporting.

Undermining the independence of the civil service.

Undermining the independence of the judiciary with ????

Packing the courts with far-right justices (need comparison of how many and tactics).

Refusing to acknowledge — let alone condemn — Russia’s concerted interference the 2016 election on his behalf.

Siding with Russian intelligence reports of US intelligence reports.

Withholding US aid to a foreign nation, while making it clear that the money was contingent upon that government digging up dirt on a political rival.

 Preferring the company of dictators to democratic leaders.

Amassing an astronomical number of untruths, and generally showing contempt for facts.

Trump’s anti-democratic push dovetails nicely with voter disenfranchisement by the Republican party. Generally, the complicity of the Republican Senate (which represents approximately X% of Americans) has encouraged Trump’s dismantling of the checks and balances necessary for a democratic (as opposed to an autocratic) division of power.

You can read and read and read until you’re blue in the heart.

Here are a couple quotes to illustrate how Trump is not kidding, how this is not a joke:

“He’s now president for life. President for life,” Trump said of Xi [after China removed the two-term limit on their state-chosen presidents]. “No, he’s great. And look, he was able to do that. I think it’s great. Maybe we’ll have to give that a shot someday.”

“We’ve cut more regulations in a year and a quarter than any administration, whether it’s four years, eight years or, in one case, 16 years,” he said. “Should we go back to 16 years? Congressman, can we have that extended? The last time I jokingly said that, the papers started saying ‘he’s got despotic tendencies!’ No, I’m not looking to do it, unless you want to do it.”

“Get rid of the ballots [apparently in reference to mail-in ballots] and you’ll have a very peaceful — there won’t be a transfer, frankly. There will be a continuation.” [This exchange happened while a reporter was trying to get Trump to agree to a peaceful transfer of power if he lost the election. Trump would not agree to that.]

A “continuation”. 
Like in Russia.
Or China.
One heroic party ruling forever in eternal glory: 
Please agree! Or risk wealth, prestige, safety, family, life. The choice is yours. See, we have choices here too! What do you need democracy for?

It is happening. Trump is prepping, is grooming us for an autocratic takeover, while simultaneously taking the practical steps necessary to realize this coup of our shared democracy.

2.
We must prefer the preservation of our representative democracy over specific political victories. Because to the degree we lose representative democracy, we lose the ability to influence our shared democracy, and there is no longer an effective check on madness, corruption, and tyranny.

That is to say: Representative democracy is a fundamental good, and destroying it in the name of any particular “good” is akin to destroying an individual’s ability to make coherent and meaningful decisions in the name of some particular “good”. It is self-defeating. 

Accordingly, we citizens of the United States of America should do everything in our power to inform our fellow citizens that Donald Trump presents an immediate, acute threat to our shared representative democracy. We should work to elect Joseph Biden, who is willing and able to help us begin the process of restoring and reinvigorating democracy in our country. And we should work to make sure this election is fair.

We’ve written many essays about how Representative Democracy is a Spiritual Good. But the basic argument is pretty self-explanatory: 

The more corrupt and/or cut-throat the political/economic/societal climate, the harder it is to be both happy and decent. 

We make our fundamental civic duty of serving as a final check on madness and corruption in government much easier to the degree that we maintain our government’s transparency, openness, honesty, clarity, accuracy, competency, civility, good-faith, and the rules and norms that preserve the balance of power and keep any individual or group from amassing too much power.

To the degree we lose shared control over our government, all our political opinions become moot as the juggernaut of corruption maintaining itself pursues a more and more desperate and desolate, scorched earth, my-ends-justify-any-means logic. And the more that becomes our background reality, the hardier it is to enjoy material wealth and basic goods like safety and decent food and clean water without becoming complicit in cheating, stealing, fraud, cruelty, and general injustice. The easier and more likely it becomes for us and our fellow citizens to sacrifice common decency, and so harm our souls even as we harm the world.

By preserving representative democracy, we make it easier for us and other people to be both happy and decent. And we make it easier for goodness to be effective: because in a healthy government, good, wholesome, helpful, win-win ideas, services, and organizations gain more power and prestige and thus have more ability to do good. Whereas the more corrupt a government, the easier it is for harmful, corrupt, unhealthy organizations to gain the upper hand and thus have more ability to do bad.

Some argue that, for example, abortion is so evil that one must vote Republican in order to fill the court with justices who will overturn Roe v. Wade. This argument assumes either that the Republican party will never gain so much power, corruption, and ill-will that it would accept the destruction of our democracy; or it assumes that abortion is so bad that ridding the land of it is worth accepting a despotic autocracy. As outlined above, the former assumption is clearly a very questionable and dangerous one. And as for the latter argument: Once you effectively destroy a democracy, you don’t know and cannot control how the autocratic power structures will evolve. Perhaps in a few years, the government will decide that any woman who already has a child will have to abort the second one. (Is a link needed to point out that such a move is not unprecedented in recent human history?)

But aren’t they all hopelessly corrupt? Can a vote for Biden really make a difference. We have tried above to point out the ways in which Trump has consistently sought to abandon the democratic game-plan for an autocratic. Below we list a few links from experts on the subject, who are sounding the alarm that Trump is not just a flawed human and a bad president, but a unique, acute, and imminent threat to our democracy:America’s Democratic Unraveling
Countries fail the same way businesses do, gradually and then suddenly.www.foreignaffairs.com

https://news.berkeley.edu/2020/09/30/american-democracy-needed-reforms/Is the U.S. a failed state in 2020? Experts’ answers range from “maybe” to “hell, yes”
If the United States isn’t a failed state in 2020, it is rapidly on its way toward becoming one. Economists, historians…www.salon.com
Donald Trump Is Attacking American Democracy at Its Core
One thing you cannot accuse Donald Trump of is trying to disguise his nefarious intentions. For months now, legal…www.newyorker.com

https://www.buzzfeednews.com/article/davidmack/foreign-election-observer-experts-fear-for-us-democracy